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Member Spotlight

Tim Rigby


Member Since: Sep 8, 2005
Posts: 473
Newest Members

Cambeley, United Kingdom
Trinidad s/n 414
Lakeland, FL
Trinidad s/n 864
Ottawa, ON
Trinidad s/n 2001
Upper Nyack, NY
Trinidad s/n 2042
Prescott, AZ
Trinidad s/n 901
Wilmington, DE
Tampico s/n 1326
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

Aviation Safety


Download The Full May 2019 Issue PDF

Checking the weather for a short afternoon flight showed visibility of more than 10 sm and clear skies locally, with a barely moving front off to the west. The forecast showed nothing unusual, although clouds and limited visibility were expected to arrive with nightfall several hours after my anticipated landing time. The temperature/dew point spread was narrow, but around the Great Lakes, we often had high humidity content at lower altitudes as moisture blew in off the water. Seeing ground-level dewpoints only a few degrees away from temperatures wasn’t concerning. Overall, the weather looked great for a local sightseeing flight in the late afternoon.

Bad Bushings

Found damage on shock absorber assembly. Damage caused from the top boss contacting the shaft shock absorber shaft. The bushing was discovered missing on three aircraft at the same flight school. The manufacturer was notified of damage, affected parts replaced and the aircraft was returned to service. The quality/airworthiness department is currently reviewing work orders in an effort to isolate aircraft affected by this missing bushing. All three aircraft with missing bushings had between 1300 and 1400 hours total time.

Local Phenomena

Checking the weather for a short afternoon flight showed visibility of more than 10 sm and clear skies locally, with a barely moving front off to the west. The forecast showed nothing unusual, although clouds and limited visibility were expected to arrive with nightfall several hours after my anticipated landing time. The temperature/dew point spread was narrow, but around the Great Lakes, we often had high humidity content at lower altitudes as moisture blew in off the water. Seeing ground-level dewpoints only a few degrees away from temperatures wasn’t concerning. Overall, the weather looked great for a local sightseeing flight in the late afternoon.

NTSB Reports

As the airplane was vectored to avoid “cells” and “areas of heavy precipitation,” the controller queried the pilot about his inability to maintain assigned headings. The pilot reported that his autopilot “had kicked off” and that “the winds are really weird up here.” At about 1310, the airplane slowed to about 70 knots groundspeed on a northeasterly heading before it began an accelerating 90-degree right turn to the south. By 1313, the controller again asked, “...appears you've turned back to the northwest and...are you going to turn back eastbound?” The pilot replied, “I don't know what's going on up here. I'm working on instruments…acting really goofy here.” Shortly thereafter, the airplane turned and descended from a northerly heading sharply to its right. The radar track tightened to the right as the target rapidly descended, then disappeared at about 1315 in an area that depicted heavy precipitation.

Losing Attitude

All other things being equal, one of the benefits of a primary flight display (PFD, which presents flight instrumentation on an electronic panel) is its use of a solid-state attitude and heading reference system, sometimes known as an AHARS. By using an AHARS to determine which side is up and in which direction the airplane is pointed, the vacuum-driven system is avoided and usually only an electrical system failure or failure of the display itself can eliminate the flight instruments. (Certification rules require backup flight instruments when a PFD is present but not when steam gauges are energized by a vacuum pump.)

FAA


FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

5/23/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Closing Remarks at Directorates General Meeting Thanks for joining us. Todays meeting was both comprehensive and constructive. While the tragic circumstances that brought all of us together might be considered extraordinarythere is nothing extraordinary about the level of commitment to safety shared by all of us. Our sense of missionthat makes aviation the safest form of transportationruns strong and deep, and binds all of us. If not in one meeting in Ft. Worth, we are comparing notes in symposiums around the world, were in web-based conferences, or we simply pick up the phone.So, let me give you a short recap of what we covered today:How the FAA responded to the MAX accidents and how were supporting the two international accident investigationsHow we plan to certify Boeings MCAS changes and how weve been sharing information with all the regulators here.The latest status on the Technical Advisory Board, or TAB, which is reviewing Boeings MCAS software update and system safety assessment. As you know, the TAB is tasked with identifying any issues where further investigation is recommended before we approve the MCAS design change.Details of the Boeings proposed changes to the MAX both to the flight control system and pilot trainingA review of the technical steps and sequence of events that we anticipate would be involved in ungrounding the MAX fleet here in the United StatesA discussion of international considerations for returning the MAX to service outside the United StatesWhat happens next is that, here in the U.S., we await Boeings completed for changes to the MAX. Once received we perform our final risk assessments and analyses, taking into account findings of the TAB and any information we receive from our international counterparts. Well also take part in test flights of a modified 737 MAX and weigh all the information together before making the decision to return the aircraft to service.Internationally, each country has to make its own decisions, but the FAA will make available to our counterparts all that we have learned, all that we have done, and all of our assistance under our International Civil Aviation Organization commitments.As all of us work through this rigorous process, we will continue to be transparent and exchange all that we know and all that we do to strengthen the publics confidence that the aircraft will meet the highest safety standards.5/22/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Opening Remarks at Directorates General MeetingGood afternoon and welcome to the FAAs Southwest Regional office here in Fort Worth. As you know, tomorrow well be meeting with dozens of regulators from across the globe to discuss our ongoing efforts aimed at getting the Boeing 737 MAX back into service.Well be sharing with them the safety analysis that will form the basis for our return-to-service decision process here in the United States, and well offer the FAAs assistance in helping them with their individual decisions on returning the aircraft to service in their countries. Well also welcome their feedback to help us with our shared goal of keeping aviations safety record the envy of other transportation modes.The FAA and our colleagues around the world know that the success of the global aviation system rests squarely on our shared commitment of safety and our common understanding of what it takes to achieve it. Its because we have a common framework through the International Civil Aviation Organization for how we design, build and operate airliners.Under that framework, The State of Design which is the United States for the MAX has the obligation to provide all States that operate an aircraft with the information that assures its safe operation. For the MAX, Boeing has not yet submitted its final request to change the MCAS, but we can share what information we do have to contribute to our safety evaluations.So thats what well do tomorrow explain our understanding of the risks that need to be addressed, the steps we propose to address those risks, and how well propose to bring the 737 MAX back to service. And let me be very clear about that the FAA will return the 737 MAX to service in the United States only when we determine based on facts and technical data that it is safe to do so.Well also discuss how making the entire process transparent toward strengthening public confidence after two accidents. We all want travelers to have the highest confidence in the aviation system when they fly.Once the meeting is completed tomorrow afternoon, well brief you again on the events of the day.Ill take your questions now.5/3/2019 3:00pm UpdateThis week, the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) team held its first meeting to review the FAAs certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from 9 civil aviation authorities worldwide, including the FAA, as well as from NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization program associated with the 737 MAX.Over the next few months, JATR participants will take a comprehensive look at the FAAs certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system. Each participant will individually provide the FAA with findings regarding the adequacy of the certification process and any recommendations to improve the process. The JATR is separate from and not required to approve enhancements for the return of the 737 MAX to service. The team concluded an initial, substantive week of gathering information and planning its next meetings.5/3/2019 1:45pm UpdateSupplemental FAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/29/2019 12:30pm UpdateThe FAA has convened todays initial Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) meeting as it evaluates aspects of the original certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. This gathering of international civilian aviation authorities and safety technical experts represents the best spirit of cooperation and collaboration that have contributed to aviations strong safety record. All participants are committed to a single safety mission, and will not rest where aviations safety record is concerned. We expect the JATR to engage in a free and candid discussion that exchanges information and improves future processes. Their work is not a prerequisite for the 737 MAX to return to service. The FAA will continue to share its technical experience and knowledge to support the international aviation community and, specifically over the next three months, the JATR participants.4/19/2019 3:00pm UpdateExperts from nine civil aviation authorities have confirmed they will participate in the Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) that the FAA established earlier this month. The JATR team will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system.The JATR is chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities. The team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. The team is scheduled to first meet on April 29 and its work is expected to take 90 days.Confirmed participants include:AustraliaCivil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA)Brazil Agencia Nacional de Aviao Civil (ANAC)CanadaTransport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA)China Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC)European Union European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)JapanJapan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB)Indonesia Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA)SingaporeCivil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS)United Arab EmiratesGeneral Civil Aviation Authority (UAE GCAA)4/16/2019 4:15pm UpdateThe FAA today posted a draft report from the Boeing 737 MAX Flight Standardization Board. The FSB reviewed only the training aspects related to software enhancements to the aircraft. The report is open to public comment for 14 days. After that, the FAA will review those comments before making a final assessment. Boeing Co. is still expected in the coming weeks to submit the final software package for certification.4/12/19 4:20pm Update FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA convened a meeting today, April 12, at the agencys Washington, D.C. headquarters with safety representatives of the three U.S.-based commercial airlines that have the Boeing 737 MAX in their fleets, as well as the pilot unions for those airlines. The approximately 3-hour meeting opened with remarks from Acting Administrator Dan Elwell and covered three major agenda items: a review of the publicly available preliminary findings of the investigations into the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents; an overview of the anticipated software enhancements to the MCAS system; and, an overview of pilot training. Each presentation corresponding to the agenda, delivered by FAA subject matter experts, allowed for an open exchange between all participants.In his opening remarks, Elwell characterized the meeting as a listening session for the FAA to hear from the participants for a fuller understanding of the safety issues presented by the Boeing 737 MAX. Elwell said that he wanted to know what operators and pilots of the 737 MAX think as the agency evaluates what needs to be done before the FAA makes a decision to return the aircraft to service. Elwell emphasized that the same level of transparency, dialog, and all available tools that have created aviations incomparable safety record also will apply to the FAAs ongoing review of the aircrafts return to service. Elwell said that the participants operational perspective is critical input as the agency welcomes scrutiny on how it can do better. As the meeting concluded, Elwell committed to the participants that the agency values transparency on its work toward the FAAs decisions related to the aircraft.4/4/19 6:10pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXFAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/4/19 8:30am UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe investigation by Ethiopian authorities remains ongoing, with the participation of the FAA and the NTSB.We continue to work toward a full understanding of all aspects of this accident.As we learn more about the accident and findings become available, we will take appropriate action.4/2/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Establishes Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) for Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA is establishing a Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR). Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities, the JATR will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. The JATR team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. 4/1/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX Software UpdateThe FAA expects to receive Boeings final package of its software enhancement over the coming weeks for FAA approval. Time is needed for additional work by Boeing as the result of an ongoing review of the 737 MAX Flight Control System to ensure that Boeing has identified and appropriately addressed all pertinent issues. Upon receipt, the FAA will subject Boeings completed submission to a rigorous safety review. The FAA will not approve the software for installation until the agency is satisfied with the submission.3/20/19 5:00pm UpdateUpdate on FAA's Continued Operational Safety Activities Related to the Boeing 737 MAX FleetFAA issues newContinued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community on Boeing 737 MAX.3/13/19 3:00pm UpdateStatement from the FAA on Ethiopian AirlinesThe FAA is ordering the temporary grounding of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory. The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today. This evidence, together with newly refined satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision.The grounding will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircrafts flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident. The agency will continue to investigate.3/12/19 6:10pm UpdateStatement from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel K. ElwellThe FAA continues to review extensively all available data and aggregate safety performance from operators and pilots of the Boeing 737 MAX.Thus far, our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft. Nor have other civil aviation authorities provided data to us that would warrant action.In the course of our urgent review of data on the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, if any issues affecting the continued airworthiness of the aircraft are identified, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.3/11/19 6:00pm UpdateThe FAA has issued a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) related to the Boeing 737-8 and Boeing 737-9 (737 MAX) fleet.3/11/19 3:15pm UpdateAn FAA team is on-site with the NTSB in its investigation of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.We are collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities as information becomes available.Today, the FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) for Boeing 737 MAX operators. The FAA continuously assesses and oversees the safety performance of U.S. commercial aircraft. If we identify an issue that affects safety, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:Thunderstorms could slow traffic today in Chicago (MDW, ORD), and gusty wind could delay flights in Boston (BOS), the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA), Philadelphia (PHL) and the Washington, D.C., area (BWI, DCA, IAD). Low clouds are expected this morning in San Francisco (SFO).Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

More Access to Airspace to Fly Drones

Starting today more than 100 control towers and airports will be added to the hundreds of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic facilities and airports that currently use theLow Altitude Authorization and Capability (LAANC) system.LAANC is a collaboration between the FAA and industry that directly supports the safe integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the nation's airspace. LAANC expedites the time it takes for a drone pilot to receive authorization to fly under 400 feet in controlled airspace. By adding contract towers to the number of LAANC-enabled facilities, drone pilots will have access to more than 400 towers covering nearly 600 airports.Contract towers are air traffic control towers that are staffed by employees of private companies rather than by FAA employees.LAANC provides air traffic professionals with visibility into where and when authorized drones are flying near airports and helps ensure that everyone can safely operate within the airspace. The expansion to more than 100 contract towers meansthe FAA has further increased drone pilots access to controlled airspace safely and efficiently.LAANC is currently used by commercial pilots who operate under theFAAs small drone rule(Part 107). The FAA is upgrading LAANC to allow recreational flyers to use the system and in the future, recreational flyers will be able to obtain authorization from the FAA to fly in controlled airspace. For now, recreational flyers who want to operate in controlled airspace may only do so at fixed sites.For updates to LAANC capabilities, visit www.faa.gov/go/laanc.

FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operations Near U.S. Navy Vessels

At the request of its federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7 Special Security Instructions to restrict drone operations over select facilities and assets.The FAA established special security instructions today that restrict drone operations in airspace up to 2,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) near U.S. territorial and navigable waters. These new restrictions specifically prohibit drone flights in this airspace within a stand-off distance of 3,000 feet laterally and 1,000 feet above any U.S. Navy vessel.UAS operators who violate the flight restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges. Violators may also face security enforcement action that results in the interference, disruption, seizure, damaging or destruction of unmanned aircraft considered to pose a safety or security threat to protected U.S. Navy assets.The restrictions are detailed in Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), and can be found at the UAS Data Display System (UDDS) website. Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operators are urged to familiarize themselves with these NOTAMs and to go to UDDS to help them comply with these FAA restrictions, which are put in place to support the nations security. UDDS provides precise descriptions of the airspace to which these restrictions are applied, procedures to access this airspace, an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data and other crucial information and tools for UAS operators. A link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app.The FAA is considering additional requests by eligible federal security agencies for UAS-specific airspace restrictions using the agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.UAS operators can find more information on a broader range of issues related to flying drones in the National Airspace System on the FAAs main UAS website, including answers to frequently asked questions.

FAA Highlights Changes for Recreational Drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is implementing changes for recreational drone flyers mandated by Congress in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.While recreational flyers may continue to fly below 400 feet in uncontrolled airspace without specific certification or operating authority from the FAA, they are now required to obtain prior authorization from the FAA before flying in controlled airspace around airports. Furthermore, they must comply with all airspace restrictions and prohibitions when flying in controlled and uncontrolled airspace.The new requirement to obtain an airspace authorization prior to flying a drone in controlled airspace replaces the old requirement to notify the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower prior to flying within five miles of an airport.Until further notice, air traffic control facilities will no longer accept requests to operate recreational drones in controlled airspace on a case-by-case basis. Instead, to enable operations under the congressionally-mandated exception for limited recreational drone operations, the FAA is granting temporary airspace authorizations to fly in certain fixed sites in controlled airspace throughout the country. The fixed sites are listed online and will be routinely updated.The sites are also shown as blue dots on Unmanned Aircraft Systems Facility Maps. The maps depict the maximum altitude above ground level at which a drone may be flown safely for each location in controlled airspace.In the future, recreational flyers will be able to obtain authorization from the FAA to fly in controlled airspace. The FAA currently has a system called the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), which is available to non-recreational pilots who operate under the FAAs small drone rule (Part 107). The FAA is upgrading LAANC to allow recreational flyers to use the system. For now, however, recreational flyers who want to operate in controlled airspace may only do so at the fixed sites.Another new provision in the 2018 Act requires recreational flyers to pass an aeronautical knowledge and safety test. They must maintain proof that they passed, and make it available to the FAA or law enforcement upon request. The FAA is currently developing a training module and test in coordination with the drone community. The test will ensure that recreational flyers have the basic aeronautical knowledge needed to fly safely.Some requirements have not changed significantly. In addition to being able to fly without FAA authorization below 400 feet in uncontrolled airspace, recreational users must still register their drones, fly within visual line-of-sight, avoid other aircraft at all times, and be responsible for complying with all FAA airspace restrictions and prohibitions.Additionally, recreational flyers can continue to fly without obtaining a remote pilot certificate provided they meet the eight statutory conditions of Section 349 of the Act, which are described in a Federal Register notice.If recreational flyers do not meet any of the conditions, they could choose to operate under Part 107 with a remote pilot certification. Drone operators who fail to comply with the appropriate operating authority may be subject to FAA enforcement action.Furthermore, flying a drone carelessly or recklessly may also result in FAA enforcement action.The FAA will help recreational flyers learn and understand the changes by posting updates and additional guidance, including regulatory changes, on the FAA website.If you are thinking about buying a drone, the FAA can help you get started with registration and important safety information.