Member Login
Username:

Password:
Remember me
Forgotten password?
Member Spotlight

Jimmy Avgoustis


Member Since: Jul 3, 2011
Posts: 1151
Newest Members

Eagle Mountain, UT
Trinidad TC s/n 557
Bad Dürkheim, Germany
Tobago s/n 451
Comstock Park, MI
Trinidad s/n 876
Woodsfield, OH
Tampico s/n 1460
Reno, NV
Trinidad s/n 1167
Bad Sassendorf, Germany
Tobago s/n 65
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Top Letters And Comments, January 17, 2020

This week's letters brought comments from readers about the latest milestone in Airbus' autonomous taxi, takeoff and landing project and how ADS-B is working out so far. The post Top Letters And Comments, January 17, 2020 appeared first on AVweb.

Industry Round-up, January 17, 2020

This week, AVweb's news roundup uncovered reports on a new flight training device based on the Piper Archer TX, the acquisition of a general aviation accessory company, a new safety registration level for a private charter jet operator. one-G Simulation has announced its new Vero 28 flight training device has been approved as an Advanced […] The post Industry Round-up, January 17, 2020 appeared first on AVweb.

Sun Air Jets achieves highest safety registration level from IS-BAO

Sun Air Jets, private charter jet operator and aircraft management company, has advanced to the highest safety registration level from the International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), IS-BAO Stage 3. The post Sun Air Jets achieves highest safety registration level from IS-BAO appeared first on AVweb.

Committee Finds Proper Process Followed In MAX Certification

A government advisory committee tasked with investigating FAA aircraft certification procedures and the certification of the grounded 737 MAX 8 has found that the proper process was followed by Boeing and the FAA when certifying the MAX. The Special Committee to Review the Federal Aviation Administration's Aircraft Certification Process also found the FAA's certification procedures […] The post Committee Finds Proper Process Followed In MAX Certification appeared first on AVweb.

Airbus Autonomous Taxi, Takeoff And Landing Project Reaches Milestone

Airbus has announced that its Autonomous Taxi, Take-Off and Landing (ATTOL) project has reached a significant milestone with the successful completion of its first fully automatic vision-based takeoff. The system being tested is designed to use image recognition technology installed on the aircraft to navigate and detect obstacles during an autonomous takeoff. The test included […] The post Airbus Autonomous Taxi, Takeoff And Landing Project Reaches Milestone appeared first on AVweb.

Aviation Safety


Download The Full January 2020 Issue PDF

The post Download The Full January 2020 Issue PDF appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Download The Full December 2019 Issue PDF

The post Download The Full December 2019 Issue PDF appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Download The Full November 2019 Issue PDF

During a routine training flight, the right engine was intentionally shut down to demonstrate inflight restarts. After a normal shutdown and securing procedure, the engine master switch was switched back to on per the checklist. Usually, this drives the propeller out of feather, and the restart procedure is continued. Instead, the propeller did not unfeather, even after attempting several troubleshooting procedures. The flight returned safely on the left engine. The post Download The Full November 2019 Issue PDF appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Failure To Communicate

I try to fly our airplane at least once every two weeks because just as its not good for a plane to just sit in a hangar, its also not good when a pilot doesnt practice their skills. Sometimes, even on clear days, I will fly instrument approaches at a nearby Class C airport. I do this for several reasons: to verify that all of the navigational instruments work properly, to practice working with ATC and if things dont work, I am in VFR conditions and am at very little risk. The post Failure To Communicate appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Propeller Problems

During a routine training flight, the right engine was intentionally shut down to demonstrate inflight restarts. After a normal shutdown and securing procedure, the engine master switch was switched back to on per the checklist. Usually, this drives the propeller out of feather, and the restart procedure is continued. Instead, the propeller did not unfeather, even after attempting several troubleshooting procedures. The flight returned safely on the left engine. The post Propeller Problems appeared first on Aviation Safety.

FAA


Vapes on a Plane?

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with other federal agencies and organizations to remind airline passengers that electronic smoking devices like vaporizers (vapes) and e-cigarettes are considered hazardous materials when transported on aircraft.Electronic smoking devices contain lithium batteries that pose a fire risk. Passengers are allowed to bring the devices on board but they must be appropriately packed. Vapes, e-cigarettes and spare lithium batteries must be placed in carry-on luggage only. Vapes and e-cigarettes should be carefully protected to prevent the device from accidentally turning on. Place the vapes or e- cigarettes in a protective case or remove the battery and place each battery in its own case or plastic bag to prevent a short circuit.Just as passengers are not allowed to smoke cigarettes on an aircraft, they should never use their vapes or e-cigarettes on an aircraft. Its not only dangerous, its a federal offense.The FAA encourages manufacturers, retailers and consumers of vapes and e-cigarettes to learn and promote the rules on flying with these products by sharing messaging from a new Vapes On A Plane Marketing Kit.More information about packing safely for air travel can be found on the Pack Safe web page.

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:Gusty winds could delay flights today in Boston (BOS), Denver (DEN) and the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA). Low clouds are forecastthis morningin San Francisco (SFO). Snow is possible in Chicago (MDW, ORD) and Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP).Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

1/16/2020Statement from FAA Administrator Steve Dickson on the Special Committees report on aircraft certificationThe FAAs first priority is safety, and we are committed to a philosophy of continuous improvement. We welcome and appreciate the Special Committees insights and recommendations. I was pleased to see that the committee recommended weadvance the use of Safety Management Systems throughout all sectors of the aviation industry. The agency will carefully consider the committees work, along with the recommendations identified in various investigative reports and other analyses, as we take steps to enhance our aircraft certification processes.1/10/2020FAA Statement on EmailsThe FAA reviewed the most recent 737 MAX-related documents submitted by Boeing for the purpose of identifying any safety implications. Our experts determined that nothing in the submission pointed to any safety risks that were not already identified as part of the ongoing review of proposed modifications to the aircraft.The FAA maintains a rigorous process for qualifying flight simulators. Upon reviewing the records for the specific simulator mentioned in the documents, the agency determined that piece of equipment has been evaluated and qualified three times in the last six months. Any potential safety deficiencies identified in the documents have been addressed.While the tone and content of some of the language contained in the documents is disappointing, the FAA remains focused on following a thorough process for returning the Boeing 737 MAX to passenger service. We continue to work with other international aviation safety regulators to review the proposed changes to the aircraft. Our first priority is safety, and we have set no timeframe for when the work will be completed.10/25/2019FAA Statement on Lion Air Flight 610 Accident ReportThe FAAs first priority is always safety.The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committees accident report on Lion Air Flight 610 is a sober reminder to us of the importance of that mission, and we again express our deepest condolences to the families and loved ones of those who were lost in that tragic accident.We welcome the recommendations from this report and will carefully consider these and all other recommendations as we continue our review of the proposed changes to the Boeing 737 MAX. The FAA is committed to ensuring that the lessons learned from the losses of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302will result in an even greater level of safety globally.The FAA continues to review Boeings proposed changes to the 737 MAX. As we have previously stated, the aircraft will return to service only after the FAA determines it is safe.10/18/2019FAA StatementLate yesterday, Boeing alerted the Department of Transportation to the existence of instant messages between two Boeing employees, characterizing certain communications with the FAA during the original certification of the 737 MAX in 2016. Boeing explained to the Department that it had discovered this document some months ago.The Department immediately brought this document to the attention of both FAA leadership and the Departments Inspector General.The FAA finds the substance of the document concerning. The FAA is also disappointed that Boeing did not bring this document to our attention immediately upon its discovery. The FAA is reviewing this information to determine what action is appropriate.The FAA has shared this document with the appropriate Congressional committees and plans to provide additional related documents today.The FAA is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 MAX to passenger service. The agency will lift the grounding order only after we have determined the aircraft is safe.---Read the letter FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent to Boeing.10/11/2019FAA Administrator Dickson is reviewing every recommendation and will take appropriate action.Statement from FAA Administrator Steve Dickson:I thank Chairman Chris Hart and the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) members for their unvarnished and independent review of the certification of the Boeing 737 MAX.As FAA Administrator, I will review every recommendation and take appropriate action.Todays unprecedented U.S. safety record was built on the willingness of aviation professionals to embrace hard lessons and to seek continuous improvement. We welcome this scrutiny and are confident that our openness to these efforts will further bolster aviation safety worldwide. The accidents in Indonesia and Ethiopia are a somber reminder that the FAA and our international regulatory partners must strive to constantly strengthen aviation safety.9/26/2019FAA welcomes and appreciates NTSB's recommendations.The FAAs first priority is safety. We welcome and appreciate the NTSBs recommendations. The agency will carefully review these and all other recommendations as we continue our review of the proposed changes to the Boeing 737 MAX. The FAA is committed to a philosophy of continuous improvement. The lessons learned from the investigations into the tragic accidents of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302will be a springboard to an even greater level of safety.9/23/2019FAA and Technical Experts Meet with Safety Regulators to Continue Discussions on Boeing 737 MaxMONTREAL The Federal Aviation Administration and a team of technical experts met today with safety regulators from around the world to discuss the continuing efforts to return the Boeing 737 MAX jetliner to service.FAA Administrator Steve Dickson and Deputy Administrator Dan Elwell delivered opening remarks to more than 50 invited officials, all of whom will play a role in clearing the aircraft for further flight in their respective nations.Ali Bahrami, the FAAs Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, provided details on the FAAs many activities to certify the aircraft since the group of regulators first met four months ago in Fort Worth, Texas. A senior Boeing Co. executive provided a technical briefing on the companys efforts to address the safety regulators shared concerns.During the meeting, Administrator Dickson pledged that the FAA would continue to share information about the FAAs activities to ensure the proposed changes to the automated flight control system on the 737 MAX meet certification standards. In the name of continuous improvement, we welcome feedback from our fellow civil aviation authorities, the aviation industry and the important independent reviews of the MAX and the FAAs certification process, Dickson said.Dickson told the group that the last few months have made it clear that, in the mind of the traveling public, aviation safety recognizes no borders. Travelers demand the same high level of safety no matter where they fly, he said. It is up to us as aviation regulators to deliver on this shared responsibility.The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to passenger service. The FAA has a transparent and collaborative relationship with other civil aviation authorities as we continue our review of changes to software on the Boeing 737 MAX. Our first priority is safety, and we have set no timeframe for when the work will be completed. Each government will make its own decision to return the aircraft to service, based on a thorough safety assessment.8/30/2019Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) Panel to Deliver Findings in Coming Weeks.The Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) panel is taking additional time to finish documenting its work. We expect the group to submit its observations, findings, and recommendations in the coming weeks.Chaired by former National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from nine civil aviation authorities worldwide, as well as the FAA and NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization activities associated with the 737 MAX.The JATRs focus on the certification of the aircraft is separate from the ongoing efforts to safely return the aircraft to flight. The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to passenger service. While the agencys certification processes are well-established and have consistently produced safe aircraft designs, we welcome the scrutiny from these experts and look forward to their findings.We will carefully review all recommendations and will incorporate any changes that would improve our certification activities.6/26/2019 4:45 p.m. UpdateFAA StatementThe FAA is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 Max to passenger service.The FAA will lift the aircrafts prohibition order when we deem it is safe to do so.We continue to evaluate Boeings software modification to the MCAS and we are still developing necessary training requirements. We also are responding to recommendations received from the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). The TAB is an independent review panel we have asked to review our work regarding 737 Max return to service.On the most recent issue, the FAAs process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks.The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing must mitigate.6/2/2019 UpdateFAA StatementBoeing has informed the FAA that certain 737NG and 737MAX leading edge slat tracks may have been improperly manufactured and may not meet all applicable regulatory requirements for strength and durability.Following an investigation conducted by Boeing and the FAA Certificate Management Office (CMO), we have determined that up to 148 parts manufactured by a Boeing sub-tier supplier are affected. Boeing has identified groups of both 737NG and 737MAX airplane serial numbers on which these suspect parts may have been installed. 32 NG and 33 MAX are affected in the U.S. Affected worldwide fleet are 133 NG and 179 MAX aircraft.The affected parts may be susceptible to premature failure or cracks resulting from the improper manufacturing process. Although a complete failure of a leading edge slat track would not result in the loss of the aircraft, a risk remains that a failed part could lead to aircraft damage in flight.The FAA will issue an Airworthiness Directive to mandate Boeing's service actions to identify and remove the discrepant parts from service. Operators of affected aircraft are required to perform this action within 10 days. The FAA today also alerted international civil aviation authorities of this condition and required actions.5/23/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Closing Remarks at Directorates General MeetingThanks for joining us. Todays meeting was both comprehensive and constructive. While the tragic circumstances that brought all of us together might be considered extraordinarythere is nothing extraordinary about the level of commitment to safety shared by all of us. Our sense of missionthat makes aviation the safest form of transportationruns strong and deep, and binds all of us. If not in one meeting in Ft. Worth, we are comparing notes in symposiums around the world, were in web-based conferences, or we simply pick up the phone.So, let me give you a short recap of what we covered today:How the FAA responded to the MAX accidents and how were supporting the two international accident investigationsHow we plan to certify Boeings MCAS changes and how weve been sharing information with all the regulators here.The latest status on the Technical Advisory Board, or TAB, which is reviewing Boeings MCAS software update and system safety assessment. As you know, the TAB is tasked with identifying any issues where further investigation is recommended before we approve the MCAS design change.Details of the Boeings proposed changes to the MAX both to the flight control system and pilot trainingA review of the technical steps and sequence of events that we anticipate would be involved in ungrounding the MAX fleet here in the United StatesA discussion of international considerations for returning the MAX to service outside the United StatesWhat happens next is that, here in the U.S., we await Boeings completed for changes to the MAX. Once received we perform our final risk assessments and analyses, taking into account findings of the TAB and any information we receive from our international counterparts. Well also take part in test flights of a modified 737 MAX and weigh all the information together before making the decision to return the aircraft to service.Internationally, each country has to make its own decisions, but the FAA will make available to our counterparts all that we have learned, all that we have done, and all of our assistance under our International Civil Aviation Organization commitments.As all of us work through this rigorous process, we will continue to be transparent and exchange all that we know and all that we do to strengthen the publics confidence that the aircraft will meet the highest safety standards.5/22/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Opening Remarks at Directorates General MeetingGood afternoon and welcome to the FAAs Southwest Regional office here in Fort Worth. As you know, tomorrow well be meeting with dozens of regulators from across the globe to discuss our ongoing efforts aimed at getting the Boeing 737 MAX back into service.Well be sharing with them the safety analysis that will form the basis for our return-to-service decision process here in the United States, and well offer the FAAs assistance in helping them with their individual decisions on returning the aircraft to service in their countries. Well also welcome their feedback to help us with our shared goal of keeping aviations safety record the envy of other transportation modes.The FAA and our colleagues around the world know that the success of the global aviation system rests squarely on our shared commitment of safety and our common understanding of what it takes to achieve it. Its because we have a common framework through the International Civil Aviation Organization for how we design, build and operate airliners.Under that framework, The State of Design which is the United States for the MAX has the obligation to provide all States that operate an aircraft with the information that assures its safe operation. For the MAX, Boeing has not yet submitted its final request to change the MCAS, but we can share what information we do have to contribute to our safety evaluations.So thats what well do tomorrow explain our understanding of the risks that need to be addressed, the steps we propose to address those risks, and how well propose to bring the 737 MAX back to service. And let me be very clear about that the FAA will return the 737 MAX to service in the United States only when we determine based on facts and technical data that it is safe to do so.Well also discuss how making the entire process transparent toward strengthening public confidence after two accidents. We all want travelers to have the highest confidence in the aviation system when they fly.Once the meeting is completed tomorrow afternoon, well brief you again on the events of the day.Ill take your questions now.5/3/2019 3:00pm UpdateThis week, the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) team held its first meeting to review the FAAs certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from 9 civil aviation authorities worldwide, including the FAA, as well as from NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization program associated with the 737 MAX.Over the next few months, JATR participants will take a comprehensive look at the FAAs certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system. Each participant will individually provide the FAA with findings regarding the adequacy of the certification process and any recommendations to improve the process. The JATR is separate from and not required to approve enhancements for the return of the 737 MAX to service. The team concluded an initial, substantive week of gathering information and planning its next meetings.5/3/2019 1:45pm UpdateSupplemental FAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/29/2019 12:30pm UpdateThe FAA has convened todays initial Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) meeting as it evaluates aspects of the original certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. This gathering of international civilian aviation authorities and safety technical experts represents the best spirit of cooperation and collaboration that have contributed to aviations strong safety record. All participants are committed to a single safety mission, and will not rest where aviations safety record is concerned. We expect the JATR to engage in a free and candid discussion that exchanges information and improves future processes. Their work is not a prerequisite for the 737 MAX to return to service. The FAA will continue to share its technical experience and knowledge to support the international aviation community and, specifically over the next three months, the JATR participants.4/19/2019 3:00pm UpdateExperts from nine civil aviation authorities have confirmed they will participate in the Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) that the FAA established earlier this month. The JATR team will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system.The JATR is chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities. The team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. The team is scheduled to first meet on April 29 and its work is expected to take 90 days.Confirmed participants include:AustraliaCivil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA)Brazil Agencia Nacional de Aviao Civil (ANAC)CanadaTransport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA)ChinaCivil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC)European UnionEuropean Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)JapanJapan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB)IndonesiaDirectorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA)SingaporeCivil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS)United Arab EmiratesGeneral Civil Aviation Authority (UAE GCAA)4/16/2019 4:15pm UpdateThe FAA today posted a draft reportfrom the Boeing 737 MAX Flight Standardization Board. The FSB reviewed only the training aspects related to software enhancements to the aircraft. The report is open to public comment for 14 days. After that, the FAA will review those comments before making a final assessment. Boeing Co. is still expected in the coming weeks to submit the final software package for certification.4/12/19 4:20pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA convened a meeting today, April 12, at the agencys Washington, D.C. headquarters with safety representatives of the three U.S.-based commercial airlines that have the Boeing 737 MAX in their fleets, as well as the pilot unions for those airlines. The approximately 3-hour meeting opened with remarks from Acting Administrator Dan Elwell and covered three major agenda items: a review of the publicly available preliminary findings of the investigations into the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents; an overview of the anticipated software enhancements to the MCAS system; and, an overview of pilot training. Each presentation corresponding to the agenda, delivered by FAA subject matter experts, allowed for an open exchange between all participants.In his opening remarks, Elwell characterized the meeting as a listening session for the FAA to hear from the participants for a fuller understanding of the safety issues presented by the Boeing 737 MAX. Elwell said that he wanted to know what operators and pilots of the 737 MAX think as the agency evaluates what needs to be done before the FAA makes a decision to return the aircraft to service. Elwell emphasized that the same level of transparency, dialog, and all available tools that have created aviations incomparable safety record also will apply to the FAAs ongoing review of the aircrafts return to service. Elwell said that the participants operational perspective is critical input as the agency welcomes scrutiny on how it can do better. As the meeting concluded, Elwell committed to the participants that the agency values transparency on its work toward the FAAs decisions related to the aircraft.4/4/19 6:10pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXFAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/4/19 8:30am UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe investigation by Ethiopian authorities remains ongoing, with the participation of the FAA and the NTSB.We continue to work toward a full understanding of all aspects of this accident.As we learn more about the accident and findings become available, we will take appropriate action.4/2/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Establishes Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) for Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA is establishing a Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR). Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities, the JATR will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. The JATR team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. 4/1/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX Software UpdateThe FAA expects to receive Boeings final package of its software enhancement over the coming weeks for FAA approval. Time is needed for additional work by Boeing as the result of an ongoing review of the 737 MAX Flight Control System to ensure that Boeing has identified and appropriately addressed all pertinent issues. Upon receipt, the FAA will subject Boeings completed submission to a rigorous safety review. The FAA will not approve the software for installation until the agency is satisfied with the submission.3/20/19 5:00pm UpdateUpdate on FAA's Continued Operational Safety Activities Related to the Boeing 737 MAX FleetFAA issues newContinued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community on Boeing 737 MAX.3/13/19 3:00pm UpdateStatement from the FAA on Ethiopian AirlinesThe FAA is ordering the temporary grounding of Boeing 737 MAX aircraftoperated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory. The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today. This evidence, together with newly refined satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision.The grounding will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircrafts flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident. The agency will continue to investigate.3/12/19 6:10pm UpdateStatement from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel K. ElwellThe FAA continues to review extensively all available data and aggregate safety performance from operators and pilots of the Boeing 737 MAX.Thus far, our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft. Nor have other civil aviation authorities provided data to us that would warrant action.In the course of our urgent review of data on the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, if any issues affecting the continued airworthiness of the aircraft are identified, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.3/11/19 6:00pm UpdateThe FAA has issued a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) related to the Boeing 737-8 and Boeing 737-9 (737 MAX) fleet.3/11/19 3:15pm UpdateAn FAA team is on-site with the NTSB in its investigation of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.We are collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities as information becomes available.Today, the FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) for Boeing 737 MAX operators. The FAA continuously assesses and oversees the safety performance of U.S. commercial aircraft. If we identify an issue that affects safety, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.

South Florida is a "No Drone Zone" During Super Bowl LIV

MiamiHard Rock Stadium near Miami is a No Drone Zone for Super Bowl LIV on Feb. 2, 2020. Drones also are prohibited around the Miami Beach Convention Center for the NFL Super Bowl Experience and Bayfront Park for Super Bowl Live during the days leading up to the event.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will establish a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) on game day that will prohibit drones within a 30-nautical-mile radius of the stadium up to 18,000 feet in altitude. The TFR will be in place from 5:30 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. EST. Drones are also prohibited for one nautical mile around Hard Rock Stadium on February 2 from 9 a.m. until the TFR for the game takes effect. Further details are available in the drone TFRs.The FAA will restrict drone flights for roughly one nautical mile around the Miami Beach Convention Center and Bayfront Park up to an altitude of 2,000 feet from January 25 to February 1 during daytime hours. Pilots and drone operators who enter the TFRs without permission could face civil penalties that exceed $30,000 and potential criminal prosecution for flying drones in the TFR.Detailed information for general aviation and drone pilots is available on the FAA's Super Bowl LIV web page.Drone pilots should check the FAAs B4UFly app to determine when and where they may fly. To highlight the No Drone Zone, watch the FAAs videos in English and Spanish encouraging fans to enjoy the game and leave their drones at home.

FAA Holding Information Meetings on LaGuardia AirTrain

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is holding Public Information Sessions on the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed LaGuardia AirTrain tonight and tomorrow night in Queens, N.Y.The FAA will be sharing the results of the draft alternatives analysis. The agency still is developing the Draft EIS (DEIS), which is planned for release in Summer 2020 after the impact analyses have been completed. At that time, the public will have the opportunity to learn about and comment on the DEIS at formal public hearings.The sessions are designed to educate attendees about the agencys analysis of the alternatives that were developed during the scoping phase of the project. The open house format will display project information, and FAA representatives will be available to answer questions. The FAA will not accept comments at the sessions this week. There will be a formal comment period when the DEIS is published.The sessions will be from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., January 14 and 15, at the New York LaGuardia Airport Marriott, 102-05 Ditmars Boulevard, East Elmhurst, N.Y. 11369.For more information, please visit the project website.