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Member Spotlight

Mark Desautelle


Member Since: Oct 28, 2009
Posts: 243
Newest Members

North Attleboro, MA
Tobago s/n 891
Borken, Germany
Tobago s/n 760
Tannum Sands, QLD
Tobago s/n 1587
Gainsborough, United Kingdom
Tobago XL s/n 1634
Piotrkow Tryb., Poland
Tobago s/n 672
Brighton, United Kingdom
Trinidad s/n 1607
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Coffee Spill Sparks Mid-Atlantic Diversion

For the want of an appropriately sized paper coffee cup and lid (sorry, Ben), likely tens of thousands of dollars and at least one day at the beach was lost by those affected by a mid-Atlantic diversion of Condor A330 earlier this year. The inconvenient chain of events damaged the airplane and disrupted the travel […] The post Coffee Spill Sparks Mid-Atlantic Diversion appeared first on AVweb.

What Has Man Wrought?

Or at least the ones--woman, too--who design modern avionics. Which is to say I'm keeping my dual-EFIS Cub. The post What Has Man Wrought? appeared first on AVweb.

Flight Trial: AeroVonics Innovative Electronic Gyros

A new start-up called AeroVonics rolled out the most innovative panel-mount electronic displays we've seen in quite some time. In this AVweb video, Paul Bertorelli gives them in a wring out in the most ludicrously overequiped Cub in the universe. The post Flight Trial: AeroVonics Innovative Electronic Gyros appeared first on AVweb.

Top Letters And Comments, September 13, 2019

This week's letters brought comments from readers about relief flights to the Bahamas and remembering 9/11. The post Top Letters And Comments, September 13, 2019 appeared first on AVweb.

Poll: Was Your Flying Directly Impacted by the 9/11 Attacks?

The post Poll: Was Your Flying Directly Impacted by the 9/11 Attacks? appeared first on AVweb.

Aviation Safety


Download The Full September 2019 Issue PDF

Once again, the Experimental Aircraft Association in July pulled off another great AirVenture fly-in at its home in Oshkosh, Wis. This year’s event had a little of everything, including torrential rain the Friday evening before Monday’s opening day, nighttime air shows and lots of airplanes of every shape, size and purpose. Perhaps because the pre-show rain knocked everyone off-kilter—followed by mid-week heat—the overall event seemed to need more cowbell, but it definitely was worthwhile checking out all the new stuff and checking in with long-time friends.

NTSB Reports

During the landing roll, three deer ran from right to left across the runway. The pilot felt a hard strike on the inboard section of the right wing, observed a deer roll over the right wing and felt a sensation of the right landing gear running over a second deer. Although the airplane sustained substantial damage to its right wing, the pilot was able to maintain control and taxied to the ramp without further incident. The pilot and passenger had to egress through the rear baggage door due to damage to the cabin door.

Preflight, Interrupted

The airline industry long ago figured out that one of the most dangerous things in aviation is two pilots trying to fly the same airplane at the same time. One inevitable result of such an arrangement is that there are times when no one is flying, and one of the ways we know this is from the accident record. Airlines evolved the pilot-flying/pilot-not-flying concept to acknowledge this characteristic of crewed cockpits and established clear responsibilities for each pilot.

Dude, Where’s My Clearance?

There are two basic ways to obtain an IFR clearance in the U.S. before departing a non-towered airport. One is to telephone Flight Service directly and get the clearance over the phone. Another is to use a remote communications outlet (RCO) to contact Flight Service or a ground communications outlet (GCO) to reach ATC over your aircraft’s communication radio. In both cases, of course, you’re likely to receive a clearance with a void time, since ATC can’t “see” you on radar until you’re airborne, and has to block off some portion of the airspace around your departure airport to ensure separation, at least until you’re in radar contact.

Our Airplanes Are Aging

The event perhaps most demonstrative of what can happen as an aircraft ages occurred on April 28, 1988, over Hawaii. That’s when an Aloha Airlines Boeing 737-200 operating in scheduled passenger service as Flight 243 between Hilo and Honolulu lost part of its cabin roof while in cruise at FL240. The crew successfully landed the airplane after diverting to Maui. Of the 89 passengers and six crewmembers aboard, there was one fatality—a flight attendant who was swept overboard during the decompression event.

FAA


FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:Thunderstorms could delay flights in Atlanta (ATL), Charlotte (CLT), Chicago (MDW, ORD), Dallas-Fort Worth (DAL, DFW), Detroit (DTW) and Houston (HOU, IAH). Gusty wind could slow traffic in the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA).Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about how to avoid loss of control (LOC) accidents.A LOC accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.LOC is the No. 1 root cause of fatalities in GA accidents. More than 25 of GA fatalities occur during the maneuvering phase of flight. Of those accidents, half involve stall/spin scenarios.Stay safe! Thisseries will show you how you can incorporate safety into every flight.Be Alert After MaintenanceDo you know how to properly preflight your aircraft after maintenance? Many pilots secretly admit that they sometimes dont quite know what they are looking for. Does that concern you? It should, since the pilot is the final authority when it comes to the aircrafts fitness for safe flight.As a pilot and/or aircraft owner, it is in your best interest to know and understand every component of your aircraft. You may think you have even less to worry about after your aircraft comes back from the shop. It should be in great shape, right?Actually, aircraft just out of maintenance are more likely to have safety-of-flight issues than an aircraft in good condition flown on a daily basis. Something simple shouldnt cause a problem, but work on multiple systems leaves the door open for more than a few complications.For example, in-flight emergencies and accidents have occurred with incorrectly rigged flight control or trim systems. Loose bolts or a forgotten connector have led to other tragedies. Its best to be on the safe side, know what work has been done, know what you are looking for, and perform thorough preflight checks.Advanced Preflight ChecksAdvanced Preflights go above and beyond the normal preflight checklist. Create your checklist by reviewing the maintenance history of the aircraft, and once you have that information, develop your additional items checklist. Once you have made this list, you can use it in all future preflight inspections. Find and review all aircraft records, including receipts, work orders, FAA Form 337s (Major Repair and Alteration forms) and approval for return to service tags (8130-3 Forms). Find any Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) data, including information on items no longer installed on the aircraft.Some additional tips:Become familiar with all controls and systems before maintenance, and create a baseline. Having this information will make it easier for you to find any abnormal functions after maintenance.Coordinate with your mechanic to determine exactly what has been accomplished. Give those systems an extra look-over before flight.Pay particular attention to the aircraft components that were replaced or repaired. If you suspect a problem, ask your mechanic to recheck the aircraft.Be ready to abort take-off if something doesnt feel right.For the first flight, stay in the pattern within gliding distance to the runway.Your safety, and the safety of those who fly with you, depends on your vigilance. Check, ask questions, and recheck. Your life may depend on it!Be sure to document your achievement in the Wings Proficiency Program. Its a great way to stay on top of your game and keep you flight review current.More about LOC:Contributing factors may include:Poor judgment or aeronautical decision makingFailure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective actionIntentional failure to comply with regulationsFailure to maintain airspeedFailure to follow procedurePilot inexperience and proficiencyUse of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcoholDid you know?From October 2017 through September 2018, 382 people died in 226 GA accidents.LOC was the No. 1 cause of these accidents.LOC happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.There is one fatal accident involving LOC every four days.Learn more:Check out this FAA FAASTeam Fact Sheet on Advanced Preflight After Maintenance.The NTSB provides these important preflight safety tips.AOPA has a number of helpful resources, including How to Pre-Flight an Airplane.Whats coming for the future? Learn about the benefits NextGen is bringing. Time is getting short! The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)comprises government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root-cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision-makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

FAA Update on Hurricane Dorian

9/8/2019The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) advises pilots about flight restrictions for Bahamian Airspace. At the request of the Bahamian Government, the FAA has issued a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) for U.S. aircraft and pilots entering Bahamian airspace in Hurricane Dorian affected areas in order to reserve airspace for search and rescue and humanitarian assistance.9/7/2019All ACAs are cancelled, except North Carolina: (FDC 9/2806(PDF)).Drone pilots should check for flight restrictions before flying.Now that Hurricane Dorian has passed, the FAA has an important reminder as U.S. government agencies respond to the storms damage.Drone pilots: beaware that you could face significant penalties that may exceed $20,000 if you interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTFRis not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.If you are not certified as a remote pilot or do not already hold a COA, you cannot fly.Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.Be aware that the FAA might issue aTFRin the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.Droneemergency operations and response:During a natural disaster, do not fly your drone in or around emergency response efforts, unless you have special authorization to do so. There are low flying aircraft as part of the storm response mostly in low visibility areas. If you are flying, emergency response operations cannot. You may be able to get expedited approval to operate in the TFR through the FAAsSpecial Governmental Interest(SGI) process as outlined inFAA Order JO 7200.23A. Submit anEmergency Operation Request Form(MS Word)with your existing Remote Pilot Certificate or existing Certification of Authorization (COA) and send to the FAA's System Operations Support Center (SOSC) at9-ator-hq-sosc@faa.gov.9/5/2019Dorian continues to move north. Airline passengers to check with their air carrier for flight cancellations and delays.As Hurricane Dorian moves north, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) advises airline passengers to check with their air carrier for flight cancellations and delays. Airlines make decisions about their flight schedules. Be aware that flights can stop long before winds reach hurricane strength.General aviation and drone pilots should continue to checkNOTAMs, Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), and Aircraft Safety Alerts before flying.The FAA has established Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the southeast coast along the projected path of Hurricane Dorian to allow disaster response and recovery flights to operate safely. Pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many aircraft are operating in the area. Drone pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast.The active ACAs are as follows:North Carolina: (FDC 9/2806(PDF))South Carolina (FDC 9/2486(PDF))Georgia (FDC 9/2301(PDF))The FAA also issued two Special Advisory NOTAMs for contingency flow operations from Florida to the Bahamas and for Bahamas recovery andresponse operations.Florida FDC 9/3851 (ZMA)Bahamas FDC 9/3941(ZMA)Ahead of the storm,FAA techniciansprotect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible to enable flights to resume quickly after the storm passes. FAA technicians fuel and test engine generators and so they can power equipment and facilities if commercial power fails. We switch to engine generator power before the storm in anticipation of commercial power failures. Watch our short video on YouTube to learn more about how the FAA handles hurricanes.9/4/2019Some Florida airports are back to normal operations as Hurricane Dorian moves north towards the Carolinas.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with our government partners and aviation stakeholders to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian. TheFAA Command Centeris managing the rerouting of flights in the airspace affected by the storm. Many airports in Florida are now back to normal operations. Airlines who fly to other airports in the path of the storm may delay or cancel flights. As always, check with your airline about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport.General aviation and drone pilots should checkNOTAMsandTFRs. Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.Be aware that the FAA might issue aTFRin the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.The FAA has established four Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the southeast coast along the projected path of Hurricane Dorian to allow disaster response and recovery flights to operate safely. Pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many aircraft are operating in the area. Drone pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast. The ACA for South Florida (FDC 9/1722) is cancelled.The active ACAs are as follows:North Carolina: (FDC 9/2806)South Carolina (FDC 9/2486)Georgia (FDC 9/2301)North Florida (FDC 9/1735)9/3/2019The FAA continues to work to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian.The FAA continues to work with our government partners and aviation stakeholders to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian. The FAA Command Center is managing the rerouting of flights and is helping airlines as they add some flights to aid evacuation efforts. As of 1:00 p.m. ET today, more than 2,000 U.S. airline flights have been cancelled due to the storm. As always, check with your airline about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Major carriers provide flight status updates on their websites:AllegiantAmerican AirlinesDelta AirlinesFrontierJetBlueSouthwest AirlinesSpiritUnited AirlinesThe agency has established three Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the eastern coast of Florida (FDC 9/1735 and FDC 9/1722) and the Georgia coast (FDC 9/2301). The ACAs allow a safe environment for disaster response and recovery flights. Aircraft pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many flights are operating in the area. Pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. The ACAs are effective until 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, September 5. However, the FAA can cancel the ACAs at any time. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast.9/1/2019Hurricane Dorian has strengthened and changed its projected path. Travelers should check with their airline before heading to the airport.The FAA is closely monitoring Category 5 Hurricane Dorian which is expected to remain a catastrophic hurricane during the next few days.The agency has a team ready to to go to the Bahamas after the storm passes to assess any damage to FAA communications equipment. We are preparing our facilities and equipment in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina.Airline passengers who plan to travel near the storms projected path, from Florida to North Carolina, should check flight status with their airline before heading to the airport. Airports make decisions about closing their facilities and may remain open even after commercial flights have stopped. Airport status and general airport delay information is available atfly.faa.gov.Follow us on Twitter @FAANews for updates and aviation safety information.8/30/2019Travelers, pilots and drone users! Stay informed about Hurricane Dorian's impact on aviation.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is monitoring Hurricane Dorian closely and preparing FAA facilities and equipment along the southeast coast of Florida to withstand potential damage so flights can quickly resume after the storm passes. Restoring air carrier service is critical to support disaster relief efforts.TravelersAirlines make decisions about their flight schedules. Flights can stop long before winds reach hurricane strength. Travelers should check with their airlines before heading to the airport for a flight to or from the southeast coast of Florida. The FAA does not direct or advise airlines about cancelling flights.Airports in the area of potential impact make decisions about closing their facilities. In many cases, airports remain open and do not officially close even when flights have stopped. The FAA does not direct or advise airports to open or close.The FAA maintains air traffic control radar coverage and provides service to flights for as long as possible. FAA control towers in hurricane-prone areas are designed and built to sustain hurricane force winds. Each control tower has a maximum wind sustainability, which can range from 55 to 75 miles per hour. When winds approach those speeds, controllers evacuate the tower cabs.Ahead of the storm, FAA technicians protect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible to enable flights to resume quickly after the storm passes. FAA technicians test engine generators and ensure they are fully fueled so they can power equipment and facilities if commercial power fails. We switch to engine generator power before the storm in anticipation of commercial power failures.After the storm, we assess damage to FAA facilities and navigational aids. We set priorities to quickly re-establish critical equipment. The FAA has equipment, supplies and people ready to move into the affected areas as soon as the storm passes to restore air traffic control facilities that may be damaged by Hurricane Dorian. Teams of technicians and engineers from other locations travel to the affected areas to assess damage and begin restoring equipment and facilities working closely with the local technical teams.General Aviation PilotsStandard checklists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents. Be sure to check NOTAMs, Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), and Aircraft Safety Alerts before you go.Check out the FAAs Hurricane Preparedness Guidance.Drone UsersDrone users should check NOTAMs and TFRs and avoid flying in areas where drones are prohibited.Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.Be aware that the FAA might issue a TFR in the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.Drone emergency operations and response:During a natural disaster, do not fly your drone in or around emergency response efforts, unless you have special authorization to do so. There are low flying aircraft as part of the storm response mostly in low visibility areas. If you are flying, emergency response operations cannot.You may be able to get expedited approval to operate in the TFR through the FAAs Special Governmental Interest(SGI) process as outlined inFAA Order JO 7200.23A. Submit an Emergency Operation Request Form with your existing Remote Pilot Certificate or existing Certification of Authorization (COA) and send to the FAA's System Operations Support Center (SOSC) at 9-ator-hq-sosc@faa.gov.Dont Be That Guy!Be aware that significant penalties that may exceed $20,000 if drone operators interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTFR is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.If you are not certified as a remote pilot or do not already hold a COA, you cannot fly.Follow the FAA on social media for the latest aviation news!

FAA, UAS Partners Complete Successful Demos

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), NASA and their partners in a pilot program that is laying the groundwork for an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) traffic management system successfully demonstrated how such a system can work in the future.The demonstrations, conducted at three separate test sites selected by the FAA for the UAS Traffic Management Pilot Program (UPP), showed that multiple, Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) drone operations can be safely conducted at low altitudes (below 400 feet) in airspace where FAA air traffic services are not provided.As demand for low altitude drone use increases, the FAA, NASA and the UPP partners are working together to accommodate these operations safely and efficiently.In January, the FAA selected three UPP test sites: the Virginia Tech Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership (VT MAAP), the Northern Plains UAS Test Site (NPUASTS) in Grand Forks, N.D., and the Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems (NIAS) in Las Vegas, Nev.The first demonstration, which involved the VT MAAP, took place at Virginia Tech on June 13.During the demonstration, separate drone flights delivered packages, studied wildlife, surveyed a corn field and covered a court case for TV. Because the flights were near an airport, all four flight plans were submitted through a service supplier and received approval to launch as planned.While these flights were being conducted, an emergency helicopter needed to quickly transport a car crash victim to a hospital. The helicopter pilot submitted a request for a UAS Volume Reservation (UVR)an alert used to notify nearby drone operators of the emergency.The deliveries were re-routed until the UVR was completed. The wildlife study, field survey and court coverage continued safely away from the helicopters path.Each operation was conducted without conflict.The second demonstration, which involved the Northern Plains UAS Test Site (NPUASTS), took place in Grand Forks on July 10.During the demonstration, which occurred near an airport, a photographer and Part 107 drone operator took photos of firefighter training. An aviation student at the University of North Dakota used a drone to scan for the best tailgating location. Another Part 107 operator, employed at the electric company, used a drone to assess power line damage after recent strong winds.The two Part 107 operators submitted flight plans due to their proximity to an airport, receiving proper approvals. During their flights, they received a UVR alert that a medevac helicopter was transporting a patient to the hospital from the firefighter training area. The operator taking photos of the training landed the drone before the UVR notice became active. The power line survey and the flight over the tailgate area continued at a safe distance.The third, which involved the Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems (NIAS), took place in Las Vegas on August 1.During the demonstration, separate UAS flights were conducted to survey a golf course before a tournament, get video footage of a property being sold, and scan a nearby lake for boating opportunities.All three operators accessed UAS Facility Maps and worked with a UAS Service Supplier (USS) to receive the proper approvals to conduct their flights.A fire erupted at one of the golf course clubhouses. First responders sent a helicopter to contain the fire. They submitted a request to a USS to create a UVR. The UVR information is also shared with the FAA. The FAA shares the information with public portals, notifying each of the UAS operators that the firefighting helicopter was on its way to their flying area.Each of the UAS operators, being properly notified, were able to either land or continue their operations at a safe distance.The UPP was established in April 2017 as an important component for identifying the initial set of industry and FAA capabilities required to support UAS Traffic Management operations. The analysis of results from the demonstrations will provide an understanding of the level of investment required for each stakeholder's implementation.The results from the UPP will provide a proof of concept for UAS Traffic Management capabilities currently in research and development, and will provide the basis for initial deployment of UTM capabilities.Ultimately, the FAA will define the UTM regulatory framework that third-party providers will operate within.Check out our video about the UPP demonstrations.

FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

8/30/2019Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) Panel to Deliver Findings in Coming Weeks.The Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) panel is taking additional time to finish documenting its work. We expect the group to submit its observations, findings, and recommendations in the coming weeks.Chaired by former National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from nine civil aviation authorities worldwide, as well as the FAA and NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization activities associated with the 737 MAX.The JATRs focus on the certification of the aircraft is separate from the ongoing efforts to safely return the aircraft to flight. The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to passenger service. While the agencys certification processes are well-established and have consistently produced safe aircraft designs, we welcome the scrutiny from these experts and look forward to their findings.We will carefully review all recommendations and will incorporate any changes that would improve our certification activities.6/26/2019 4:45 p.m. UpdateFAA StatementThe FAA is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 Max to passenger service.The FAA will lift the aircrafts prohibition order when we deem it is safe to do so.We continue to evaluate Boeings software modification to the MCAS and we are still developing necessary training requirements. We also are responding to recommendations received from the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). The TAB is an independent review panel we have asked to review our work regarding 737 Max return to service.On the most recent issue, the FAAs process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks.The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing must mitigate.6/2/2019 UpdateFAA StatementBoeing has informed the FAA that certain 737NG and 737MAX leading edge slat tracks may have been improperly manufactured and may not meet all applicable regulatory requirements for strength and durability.Following an investigation conducted by Boeing and the FAA Certificate Management Office (CMO), we have determined that up to 148 parts manufactured by a Boeing sub-tier supplier are affected. Boeing has identified groups of both 737NG and 737MAX airplane serial numbers on which these suspect parts may have been installed. 32 NG and 33 MAX are affected in the U.S. Affected worldwide fleet are 133 NG and 179 MAX aircraft.The affected parts may be susceptible to premature failure or cracks resulting from the improper manufacturing process. Although a complete failure of a leading edge slat track would not result in the loss of the aircraft, a risk remains that a failed part could lead to aircraft damage in flight.The FAA will issue an Airworthiness Directive to mandate Boeing's service actions to identify and remove the discrepant parts from service. Operators of affected aircraft are required to perform this action within 10 days. The FAA today also alerted international civil aviation authorities of this condition and required actions.5/23/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Closing Remarks at Directorates General Meeting Thanks for joining us. Todays meeting was both comprehensive and constructive. While the tragic circumstances that brought all of us together might be considered extraordinarythere is nothing extraordinary about the level of commitment to safety shared by all of us. Our sense of missionthat makes aviation the safest form of transportationruns strong and deep, and binds all of us. If not in one meeting in Ft. Worth, we are comparing notes in symposiums around the world, were in web-based conferences, or we simply pick up the phone.So, let me give you a short recap of what we covered today:How the FAA responded to the MAX accidents and how were supporting the two international accident investigationsHow we plan to certify Boeings MCAS changes and how weve been sharing information with all the regulators here.The latest status on the Technical Advisory Board, or TAB, which is reviewing Boeings MCAS software update and system safety assessment. As you know, the TAB is tasked with identifying any issues where further investigation is recommended before we approve the MCAS design change.Details of the Boeings proposed changes to the MAX both to the flight control system and pilot trainingA review of the technical steps and sequence of events that we anticipate would be involved in ungrounding the MAX fleet here in the United StatesA discussion of international considerations for returning the MAX to service outside the United StatesWhat happens next is that, here in the U.S., we await Boeings completed for changes to the MAX. Once received we perform our final risk assessments and analyses, taking into account findings of the TAB and any information we receive from our international counterparts. Well also take part in test flights of a modified 737 MAX and weigh all the information together before making the decision to return the aircraft to service.Internationally, each country has to make its own decisions, but the FAA will make available to our counterparts all that we have learned, all that we have done, and all of our assistance under our International Civil Aviation Organization commitments.As all of us work through this rigorous process, we will continue to be transparent and exchange all that we know and all that we do to strengthen the publics confidence that the aircraft will meet the highest safety standards.5/22/2019 UpdateFAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Opening Remarks at Directorates General MeetingGood afternoon and welcome to the FAAs Southwest Regional office here in Fort Worth. As you know, tomorrow well be meeting with dozens of regulators from across the globe to discuss our ongoing efforts aimed at getting the Boeing 737 MAX back into service.Well be sharing with them the safety analysis that will form the basis for our return-to-service decision process here in the United States, and well offer the FAAs assistance in helping them with their individual decisions on returning the aircraft to service in their countries. Well also welcome their feedback to help us with our shared goal of keeping aviations safety record the envy of other transportation modes.The FAA and our colleagues around the world know that the success of the global aviation system rests squarely on our shared commitment of safety and our common understanding of what it takes to achieve it. Its because we have a common framework through the International Civil Aviation Organization for how we design, build and operate airliners.Under that framework, The State of Design which is the United States for the MAX has the obligation to provide all States that operate an aircraft with the information that assures its safe operation. For the MAX, Boeing has not yet submitted its final request to change the MCAS, but we can share what information we do have to contribute to our safety evaluations.So thats what well do tomorrow explain our understanding of the risks that need to be addressed, the steps we propose to address those risks, and how well propose to bring the 737 MAX back to service. And let me be very clear about that the FAA will return the 737 MAX to service in the United States only when we determine based on facts and technical data that it is safe to do so.Well also discuss how making the entire process transparent toward strengthening public confidence after two accidents. We all want travelers to have the highest confidence in the aviation system when they fly.Once the meeting is completed tomorrow afternoon, well brief you again on the events of the day.Ill take your questions now.5/3/2019 3:00pm UpdateThis week, the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) team held its first meeting to review the FAAs certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from 9 civil aviation authorities worldwide, including the FAA, as well as from NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization program associated with the 737 MAX.Over the next few months, JATR participants will take a comprehensive look at the FAAs certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system. Each participant will individually provide the FAA with findings regarding the adequacy of the certification process and any recommendations to improve the process. The JATR is separate from and not required to approve enhancements for the return of the 737 MAX to service. The team concluded an initial, substantive week of gathering information and planning its next meetings.5/3/2019 1:45pm UpdateSupplemental FAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/29/2019 12:30pm UpdateThe FAA has convened todays initial Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) meeting as it evaluates aspects of the original certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. This gathering of international civilian aviation authorities and safety technical experts represents the best spirit of cooperation and collaboration that have contributed to aviations strong safety record. All participants are committed to a single safety mission, and will not rest where aviations safety record is concerned. We expect the JATR to engage in a free and candid discussion that exchanges information and improves future processes. Their work is not a prerequisite for the 737 MAX to return to service. The FAA will continue to share its technical experience and knowledge to support the international aviation community and, specifically over the next three months, the JATR participants.4/19/2019 3:00pm UpdateExperts from nine civil aviation authorities have confirmed they will participate in the Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) that the FAA established earlier this month. The JATR team will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system.The JATR is chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities. The team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. The team is scheduled to first meet on April 29 and its work is expected to take 90 days.Confirmed participants include:AustraliaCivil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA)Brazil Agencia Nacional de Aviao Civil (ANAC)CanadaTransport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA)China Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC)European Union European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)JapanJapan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB)Indonesia Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA)SingaporeCivil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS)United Arab EmiratesGeneral Civil Aviation Authority (UAE GCAA)4/16/2019 4:15pm UpdateThe FAA today posted a draft report from the Boeing 737 MAX Flight Standardization Board. The FSB reviewed only the training aspects related to software enhancements to the aircraft. The report is open to public comment for 14 days. After that, the FAA will review those comments before making a final assessment. Boeing Co. is still expected in the coming weeks to submit the final software package for certification.4/12/19 4:20pm Update FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA convened a meeting today, April 12, at the agencys Washington, D.C. headquarters with safety representatives of the three U.S.-based commercial airlines that have the Boeing 737 MAX in their fleets, as well as the pilot unions for those airlines. The approximately 3-hour meeting opened with remarks from Acting Administrator Dan Elwell and covered three major agenda items: a review of the publicly available preliminary findings of the investigations into the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents; an overview of the anticipated software enhancements to the MCAS system; and, an overview of pilot training. Each presentation corresponding to the agenda, delivered by FAA subject matter experts, allowed for an open exchange between all participants.In his opening remarks, Elwell characterized the meeting as a listening session for the FAA to hear from the participants for a fuller understanding of the safety issues presented by the Boeing 737 MAX. Elwell said that he wanted to know what operators and pilots of the 737 MAX think as the agency evaluates what needs to be done before the FAA makes a decision to return the aircraft to service. Elwell emphasized that the same level of transparency, dialog, and all available tools that have created aviations incomparable safety record also will apply to the FAAs ongoing review of the aircrafts return to service. Elwell said that the participants operational perspective is critical input as the agency welcomes scrutiny on how it can do better. As the meeting concluded, Elwell committed to the participants that the agency values transparency on its work toward the FAAs decisions related to the aircraft.4/4/19 6:10pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXFAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.4/4/19 8:30am UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAXThe investigation by Ethiopian authorities remains ongoing, with the participation of the FAA and the NTSB.We continue to work toward a full understanding of all aspects of this accident.As we learn more about the accident and findings become available, we will take appropriate action.4/2/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Establishes Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) for Boeing 737 MAXThe FAA is establishing a Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR). Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities, the JATR will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. The JATR team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed. 4/1/19 4:00pm UpdateFAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX Software UpdateThe FAA expects to receive Boeings final package of its software enhancement over the coming weeks for FAA approval. Time is needed for additional work by Boeing as the result of an ongoing review of the 737 MAX Flight Control System to ensure that Boeing has identified and appropriately addressed all pertinent issues. Upon receipt, the FAA will subject Boeings completed submission to a rigorous safety review. The FAA will not approve the software for installation until the agency is satisfied with the submission.3/20/19 5:00pm UpdateUpdate on FAA's Continued Operational Safety Activities Related to the Boeing 737 MAX FleetFAA issues newContinued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community on Boeing 737 MAX.3/13/19 3:00pm UpdateStatement from the FAA on Ethiopian AirlinesThe FAA is ordering the temporary grounding of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory. The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today. This evidence, together with newly refined satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision.The grounding will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircrafts flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident. The agency will continue to investigate.3/12/19 6:10pm UpdateStatement from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel K. ElwellThe FAA continues to review extensively all available data and aggregate safety performance from operators and pilots of the Boeing 737 MAX.Thus far, our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft. Nor have other civil aviation authorities provided data to us that would warrant action.In the course of our urgent review of data on the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, if any issues affecting the continued airworthiness of the aircraft are identified, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.3/11/19 6:00pm UpdateThe FAA has issued a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) related to the Boeing 737-8 and Boeing 737-9 (737 MAX) fleet.3/11/19 3:15pm UpdateAn FAA team is on-site with the NTSB in its investigation of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.We are collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities as information becomes available.Today, the FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) for Boeing 737 MAX operators. The FAA continuously assesses and oversees the safety performance of U.S. commercial aircraft. If we identify an issue that affects safety, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.