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Roland Honel


Member Since: Mar 16, 2008
Posts: 460
Newest Members

Idaho Falls, ID
Trinidad TC s/n 639
Tierp, Sweden
Tampico s/n 1290
Salinas, CA
Tobago s/n 1155
Puimoisson, France
Trinidad s/n 2207
Van Lear, KY
Trinidad TC s/n 1598
York, YT
Tobago s/n 250
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Top Letters And Comments, June 11, 2021

This week's letters brought comments from readers about Oshkosh arrivals, air traffic control and flying to AirVenture. The post Top Letters And Comments, June 11, 2021 appeared first on AVweb.

Leonardo Delivers First Navy TH-73A Training Helicopter

Leonardo Helicopters delivered the first TH-73A training helicopter to the U.S. Navy during a ceremony at its facility in Philadelphia on Thursday. The TH-73A is expected to replace the Navy's fleet of TH-57 Sea Ranger trainers, which will be phased out beginning in fiscal year 2022. The Navy has ordered a total of 130 TH-73A […] The post Leonardo Delivers First Navy TH-73A Training Helicopter appeared first on AVweb.

Picture of the Week, June 10, 2021

Taken at Meridian Aviation (KMEI) on June 4 just after a thunderstorm. Photo by Scott Stephens submitted by Mark Cheplowitz. The post Picture of the Week, June 10, 2021 appeared first on AVweb.

Yingling Aviation Celebrates 75 Years With Facility Expansion

Wichita, Kansas-based maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) and FBO company Yingling Aviation is marking its 75th anniversary with the expansion of its facilities at Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport (ICT). The company recently purchased three hangars, adding 50,000 square feet of hangar and office facilities to its existing 200,000 square feet of space at the […] The post Yingling Aviation Celebrates 75 Years With Facility Expansion appeared first on AVweb.

French Aviation Companies To Launch Sustainable Fuel Study

Airbus, Safran, Dassault Aviation, ONERA and France's Ministry of Transport are launching a joint study to assess the compatibility of unblended sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) with single-aisle aircraft, commercial aircraft engine and fuel systems and helicopter engines. The VOLCAN (VOL avec Carburants Alternatifs Nouveaux) project includes an in-flight test to be conducted at the end […] The post French Aviation Companies To Launch Sustainable Fuel Study appeared first on AVweb.

Aviation Safety


Download The Full June 2021 Issue PDF

The Lost Art of the Circling Approach Training Risks Fuel Exhaustion MTRs Flaps And Crosswinds To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber Subscribe   Subscribe to Aviation Safety Start a subscription to Aviation Safety for just $18. And access all of our online content - over 5,000 articles - free of charge. Subscribe today and save 39. It's like getting 2 months FREE! Already Subscribed? Click Here to Sign In | Forgot your password? | Activate Web Access The post Download The Full June 2021 Issue PDF appeared first on Aviation Safety.

The Lost Art of Circling

With the rise in quality and quantity of GPS approaches, especially at smaller airports, the beloved circling approach is becoming an infrequently used maneuver. That's a shame, since circling to a preferred runway after breaking out on an approach can help resolve many challenges in the IFR environment. Having the confidence to circle is one […] To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber Subscribe   Subscribe to Aviation Safety Start a subscription to Aviation Safety for just $18. And access all of our online content - over 5,000 articles - free of charge. Subscribe today and save 39. It's like getting 2 months FREE! Already Subscribed? Click Here to Sign In | Forgot your password? | Activate Web Access The post The Lost Art of Circling appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Fast-Movers, Close By

I started learning to fly at the quaint, waterfront Albert-Whitted Airport in St. Petersburg, Fla., back in the 1980s. It was a great place to fly—beautiful scenery, plenty of options of places to go for practice landings and a reasonably easy airspace set up to facilitate painless statewide cross-country flights. There was one caveat, however. Just […] To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber Subscribe   Subscribe to Aviation Safety Start a subscription to Aviation Safety for just $18. And access all of our online content - over 5,000 articles - free of charge. Subscribe today and save 39. It's like getting 2 months FREE! Already Subscribed? Click Here to Sign In | Forgot your password? | Activate Web Access The post Fast-Movers, Close By appeared first on Aviation Safety.

Flaps In A Gusty Cross?

There's normal, and then there's normal. Which is to say that while much of aviation relies on routine procedures and aircraft configurations, among other things, there are exceptions to most norms. For example, the FAA long ago declared a “normal” landing to be one with an airplane's wing flaps, if any, fully deployed. That's not […] To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber Subscribe   Subscribe to Aviation Safety Start a subscription to Aviation Safety for just $18. And access all of our online content - over 5,000 articles - free of charge. Subscribe today and save 39. It's like getting 2 months FREE! Already Subscribed? Click Here to Sign In | Forgot your password? | Activate Web Access The post Flaps In A Gusty Cross? appeared first on Aviation Safety.

The End Of Six Delta Fox

When my student crashed last week, I was one of the first to know. After experiencing relief that there were no injuries and disappointment that the Tecnam P2002 Sierra likely would not fly again, an unsettling feeling—was there something more I could have done?—took over. Maybe by relating in detail what happened, what decisions the […] To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber Subscribe   Subscribe to Aviation Safety Start a subscription to Aviation Safety for just $18. And access all of our online content - over 5,000 articles - free of charge. Subscribe today and save 39. It's like getting 2 months FREE! Already Subscribed? Click Here to Sign In | Forgot your password? | Activate Web Access The post The End Of Six Delta Fox appeared first on Aviation Safety.

FAA


Runway Safety Town Hall: Air Traffic Ramps Up This Summer

As the summer approaches, we can expect a rise in airport traffic in the air and on the runways. With this in mind, the Federal Aviation Administration is redoubling its effort to offer guidance, resources and expertise to preempt any airfield errors by general aviation pilots, especially those who have spent a year away from the cockpit.On June 16, the FAA is hosting a Runway Safety Town Hall for all General Aviation pilots. It will be a live online event that will offer best practices and a lively discussion from GA pilots, air traffic controllers and runway safety experts.The focus of the Town Hall is to help pilots reduce the risk of airfield errors and lower the potential for accidents. Discussion topics by pilots and air traffic experts will include preflight preparation, situational awareness, focused and clear communications, knowledge of runway geometry and signage, and more.The Runway Safety Town Hall for General Aviation pilots will run from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.Eastern Daylight Time on Wednesday, June 16. The event is free.Pilots can register for the event here. Participants registered on the livestream will have the opportunity to ask questions of the panelists and will receive FAA WINGS credit for attending the entire event. The Town Hall also will be livestreamed on FAAs YouTube channel, but viewers on this channel will not be able to ask questions nor gain WINGS credit.

FAA Approves Renewal of Oklahoma Spaceport License

After completing a comprehensive review, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved the renewal of the spaceport license for the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority.Thelicense authorizes the Authority to operate a launch site at the Clinton-Sherman Industrial Airpark in Burns Flat, Okla., in support of FAA-licensed or permitted suborbital missions by reusable launch vehicles. The license is valid for five years.There are currently 12 commercial FAA-licensed spaceports, located in Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia (see map).The FAAs top priority in regulatingcommercial space transportationis that launch and reentry operations are safe for the public.The agency protects public safety by licensing commercial launch and reentry activities and monitoring FAA-licensed operations to make sure all phases comply with the regulations. The FAA also issues safety approvals for launch and reentry vehicles, various safety systems and the personnel performing licensed activities.AnFAA licenseis required to conduct any commercial launch or reentry, the operation of any launch or reentry site by U.S. citizens anywhere in the world, or by any person or entity within the United States.Learn more about the FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation.[KSW(1]Add link.

Don't Forget to Register for the 2021 FAA UAS Symposium

There is still time to register for Episodes III and IV of the virtual FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Symposium.The theme for this years event is Above and Beyond and it will take place on June 9-10, 2021 and Sept. 14-15, 2021. This is a unique opportunity to have your drone questions answered from leaders in the industry, who will discuss future technologies and regulations that support the safe integration of drones into the national airspace system.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) are co-hosting the symposium. Each episode will feature keynote presentations, expert panels, informational sessions with live Q&A, roundtable discussions and one-on-one meetings with experts from the FAA UAS Support Center. The full agenda and session descriptions for Episode III are available on the symposium website. The agenda for Episode IV will be posted in the summer.Episode III keynote speakers:FAA Administrator, Steve DicksonFAA Office of UAS Integration, Executive Director, Jay MerkleAUVSI President and CEO, Brian WynneEpisode III (June 9-10) sessions will focus on:Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) EducationInternational standardsPublic safety operationsRecreational communityCommercial operationsEpisode IV (September 14-15) sessions will focus on:Operational AdvancementsBeyond Visual Line of Sight OperationsInternational DevelopmentsDont miss out on this exciting opportunity to learn and network-register now!

Boeing to Pay at Least $17 Million to Settle Enforcement Cases on 737

Additional penalties may be levied if corrective actions are not completed on time.

FAA Issues Policy on Solar Projects on Airports

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published a final policy aimed at ensuring that airport solar projects dont create hazardous glare. The policy requires airports to measure the visual impact of such projects on pilots and air traffic control personnel.The policy applies to proposed solar energy systems at federally obligated airports with control towers. Federally obligated airports are public airports that have accepted federal assistance either in the form of grants of property conveyancesAs more airports invests in this technology for environmental and economic benefits, the FAA wants to make sure that the reflection from the systems glass surfaces do not create a glare that poses a safety hazard for pilots and air traffic controllers.Under the final policy, airports are no longer required to submit the results of an ocular analysis to FAA. Instead, the airport must file a Notice of Proposed Construction or Alteration Form 7460-1 that includes a statement that the project will not cause any visual impact. The airport submits the form to the FAA for review and approval.The FAA relies on the airport to confirm via the form that it has sufficiently analyzed the potential for glint and glare and determined there is no potential for ocular impact to the airport traffic control tower cab. If any impacts are discovered after construction, the airport must mitigate the impact at its expense. The airport may also face compliance action for failure to address visual impacts that create aviation safety hazards. As such, the agency encourages an airport to conduct sufficient analysis before installing a solar energy system.The FAA is also withdrawing the recommended tool for measuring the ocular impact of potential glint and glare effects on pilots and air traffic controllers.This final policy supersedes the interim policy published in 2013.